Dual Capacity Building Framework

The Dual Capacity Building Framework for Family-School Partnerships is designed to spark a focus on developing and maintaining positive relationships with the families and the community. It provides a way to think about and organize actions from a variety of entry points on the road towards effective family and community partnerships supporting student achievement and school improvement.

Process Conditions

The series of actions, operations, and procedures key to the design of initiatives building the capacity of families, school staff, and the community to partner in ways that support student achievement and school improvement.

Linked to Learning

Strategies to Support

Actions Connected to Strategies

  • Understanding by school personnel and parents/families/community of how the Literacy Plan is linked to student learning.
  • Communicate to students how a particular assignment or activity will lead to the larger literacy goal.
  • Create opportunities to communicate to parents about what the school’s literacy goals are and how the parent can participate in the teaching/learning process.
  • Use school events and activities as opportunities to share information about school and or district academic and developmental goals for students. Enhance the capacity of families and staff to collaborate with one another to support student literacy.
  • Create, publish and disseminate the school’s Literacy Goals and how they link to the District’s Literacy Plan.
  • Provide students with information that helps them understand how literacy intersects in all subject areas and in real life situations.
  • Develop professional development opportunities for staff to help them understand not just the information being taught but also what they can do to help parents understand.
  • Implement professional development/training sessions for parents, families and community members that will expand student’s literacy knowledge and skills.

Relational

Strategies to Support

Actions Connected to Strategies

  • Building respectful and trusting relationships between home and school.
  • Consider the experiences – past and present – that may contribute to parent’s feelings of unease or distrust when it comes to interacting with school and district staff.
  • Focus on literacy can be a great change agent for building trust with parents by providing them with strategies and activities that can assist both the parent and the child in improving outcomes.
  • Ensure that both school staff and parents understand the necessity for both to act cooperatively in support of student achievement.
  • Reinforce the home/school connection by providing in-service training for teachers and workshops for parents focusing on literacy and ways that they can work collaboratively to meet school and district literacy goals.
  • Meet parents where they are and be prepared to offer literacy support for parents who may be in need of help in this area.
  • Take every opportunity to interact with parents in a welcoming and inclusive manner which encourages open dialogue.
  • Provide parents with accessible and meaningful information that allows them to be fully engaged in their children’s literacy development.
  • Help parents understand how they can assist their children in the learning process.
  • Provide materials and trainings that address the specific concerns of the teacher and the parent.
  • Include information and access to resources for parents/families that strengthen the family by connecting them to services and service providers including GED, adult literacy, libraries, etc.

Developmental

Strategies to Support

Actions Connected to Strategies

  • Parents and other community stakeholders need to feel empowered and enabled participants in the educational process.
  • Focus on developmental literacy milestones that provide parents with the information they need to be able to track student progress and implement learning activities at home.
  • Help parents build the capacity to make meaningful contributions to their children’s literacy development.
  • Give parents a voice in the development and a role in implementation of literacy programming.
  • Help parents build the capacity to make meaningful contributions to their children’s literacy development.
  • Produce materials for parents and students that are easy to understand.
  • Assist parents in understanding how their engagement contributes to their child’s ability to meet reading and comprehension expectations.
  • Provide opportunities for community stakeholders to participate in the school’s literacy plan implementation.
  • Develop workbooks, toolkits, web-based programming that community stakeholders can share with constituents, employees, members and encourage them to utilize.

Collective/
Collaborative

Strategies to Support

Actions Connected to Strategies

  • Learning is conducted in group rather than individual settings and is focused on building learning communities and networks.
  • Involve school parent groups in the process. These can include PTA, PTSA, PTO, DAC, Booster, etc.
  • Bring staff and parents together for shared learning around literacy goals and anticipated outcomes.
  • Help parents and community stakeholders understand the role they can play in making connections between what happens in the classroom and what happens in the home/community.
  • Create Literacy Teams composed of parents, school staff and community members.
  • Communicate and demonstrate what students are working on and how parents/community can participate in the learning process.
  • Introduce a literacy component in all parent engagement activities offered by the school.
  • Post literacy facts/actions in the school front office and on the school website.

Interactive

Strategies to Support

Actions Connected to Strategies

  • Participants are given opportunities to test out and apply new skills. Skill mastery requires coaching and practice.
  • Share information with parents about what they can do to support their children’s literacy development but also demonstrate how the strategies can be used.
  • Provide parents with feedback and coaching to guide them in their literacy interactions at home and at school.
  • Conduct interactive workshops and trainings with parents so that they can experience first hand how the process should work and teachers can observe the level of the parent skill mastery.
  • Develop workshops and other opportunities for school staff and parents to practice the strategies shared.
  • Close the loop between the information schools give to parents and the way in which this information is infused into the interactions between teachers, parents, and students.
  • Use existing technology to provide parents with opportunities to practice new techniques and assess their abilities.
  • Involve parents in the process of developing and delivering material.